IS IT COLD IN THE WATER?


The monsoon is a seasonal reversal of winds that brings rain to a region during its wet season (and none when it’s supposed to be dry). Crossing West Africa, Asia–Australia, and North and South America, this cyclical phenomenon of exceptionally regular winds is one of the reasons behind the development of civilization. As humanity walked out of the volatile Ice Age into the predictable weather of the Holocene Epoch, more temperate conditions allowed for agriculture and settlement. For Creamcake’s “Is it cold in the water?” moving-image program—screening online at 3hdTV from May 30 to July 30—a curated selection of films reflects on the distinct systems within which water circulates, and its entangled historical, political, social, and cultural implications.

Five works by five artists and collaborations mirror these interdependent global atmospheric wind patterns in the unique approaches to addressing existential issues of colonial extractivism, capitalist ecocide, and environmental collapse—water being both their symbolic and literal catalyst. Seba Calfuqueo’s Kowkülen (Liquid Being) draws parallels between concepts of gender and sexual fluidity across bodies of water and historical attempts to both control and restrict them in Chile, while Black Ecology by Davi Pontes explores how advances in science continue to uncover ideas of racial extraction that have no end in a specifically Latin American context. Emilija Škarnulytė’s Sirenomelia links human, nature, and machine to posit possible post-human mythologies through her portrait of a mermaid, and Rita Macedo’s Farewell recording for an observer of an unknown time and place is an essayistic digression on capitalism, the environment, technology, and death through hypothetical temporalities across coastal and inland wetlands. Abdul Qadim Haqq, DeForrest Brown, Jr., & Dopplereffekt share their multi-generational epic tale of The Timeline of Black Exodus Technology, a mythological science fiction from within the underwater Drexciya universe.

The question of how the history and politics of water has shaped humanity—and the environment on which it depends for its own survival—is a complex one. Its influences and effects are as interrelated as the monsoon winds that helped civilization flourish in the first place and the global impact of these shifts and disruptions could be catastrophic. Together, these five films speculate on how, why, and where to now. 

KOWKÜLEN (LIQUID BEING)
Seba Calfuqueo


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May 30--:--:--

KOWKÜLEN (LIQUID BEING)
Seba Calfuqueo

A bodily, personal, and poetic journey exploring water in its various forms, Kowkülen (Liquid Being) travels the wetlands, lakes, oceans, rivers, and springs. The work addresses the concepts of body, binarism, gender, sexuality, and the historical relationship between water and life, as well as their potential as a living space, necessary to the relationship of all territories.

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BLACK ECOLOGY
Davi Pontes


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May 10--:--:--

BLACK ECOLOGY
Davi Pontes

Black Ecology is an experimental film, an excavation of scientific images (oceanographic archive), and reimagined ocean landscapes generated by software images. These fragments of moving images guide us to think about the racial dimension of extractivist relations. They go beyond a place-based configuration of environmental racism as a spatial organization of exposure to environmental harm. Instead, they mobilize us to think about how advances in science continue to uncover ideas of racial extraction that have no end.

Inspired by philosopher Denise Ferreira da Silva, the project is an experiment in thinking and existing within Black ethics, attempting to bring a Black timeline, and a space for Black ecology to the study of contemporary capitalism. It does so by looking at zones ignored by the “Anthropocene” concept, including specific power relations and social inequalities tied to extractive action and environmental transformation in the Latin American context.

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SIRENOMELIA
Emilija Škarnulytė


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May 30--:--:--

SIRENOMELIA
Emilija Škarnulytė

Set in far-northern territories where cold, Arctic waters meet rocky escarpments on which radio telescopes record fast-traveling quasar waves, Sirenomelia links human, nature and machine, and posits possible post-human mythologies. Shot in an abandoned Cold-War submarine base in Olavsvern, Norway, the film is a cosmic portrait of one of humankind’s oldest mythic creatures—the mermaid. The artist, performing as a siren, swims through the decrepit NATO facility, while signals and white noise traverse the entirety of space, reaching its farthest corners, beyond human impact. Also exhibited under the title No Place Rising.

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FAREWELL RECORDING FOR AN OBSERVER OF AN UNKNOWN TIME AND PLACE
Rita Macedo


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May 30--:--:--

FAREWELL RECORDING FOR AN OBSERVER OF AN UNKNOWN TIME AND PLACE
Rita Macedo

Part speculative history of the future, part world-building rendering, Farewell recording for an observer of an unknown time and place is an essayistic digression on capitalism, environment, technology, and death. Central to the work is the Invasive Landscape Phenomenon, a mysterious, fast-spreading malady reminiscent of the dissociative trauma response, emerging in a world on the verge of ecological collapse, where mediated experience replaces physical presence. The omnipresent voice of a narrator weaves the layers of the film’s reality, where wetlands fold in the outside world’s complex histories of destruction, displacement and dispossession, while notions of loss, trauma, and placelessness intertwine with environmental collapse narratives.

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THE TIMELINE OF BLACK EXODUS TECHNOLOGY
AbuQadim Haqq & DeForrest Brown & Dopplereffekt


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May 10--:--:--

THE TIMELINE OF BLACK EXODUS TECHNOLOGY
AbuQadim Haqq & DeForrest Brown & Dopplereffekt

The Timeline of Black Exodus Technology is a sonic fiction and suspended animation by techno visual artist AbuQadim Haqq, rhythmanalyst DeForrest Brown, Jr., and Dopplereffekt (To-Nhan and Rudolf Klorzeiger aka Gerald Donald, the surviving member of the techno duo Drexciya). This retroactive continuation of the Drexciyan Storms charts a view into the Extro-Myth-Science World System of Spaceship Earth 2.0. 

Edited by Ting Ding 丁汀, the film comprises over 33 years of paintings from the Books of Drexciya graphic novels, The Technanomicron art book and CD compilation, as well as the touring Goethe-Institut exhibition, Techno Worlds, and the “Third Earth Archive” within the Hope: Techno Humanities exhibition, at Museion Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Bolzano, Italy. It’s soundtracked by Dopplereffekt’s “The Ascension of Genetic Intelligence” and “Techxodus” by Speaker Music.

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